Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Rachel Maddow
Host of The Rachel Maddow Show
MSNBCW 08/19/2013
Maddow: Miss Poitras is still working on the third installment in that trilogy which is about U.S. surveillance of phone calls and e-mails and so on since 9/11. She posted a bit of that one last year on "The New York Times" website. Binney: You build social networks for everybody. That turns into the graph then you index all that data to that graph which means you can pull out a community, that that gives you an outline of the life of everybody in the community. And if you carry it over time from 2001 up, you have that ten years worth of their life that you can lay out in a timeline that involves anybody in the country. Even Senators and House of Representatives. All of them. The dangers here are that we fall into something like a totalitarian state like East Germany. Maddow: Working with top-level sources like that former NSA employee, uncovering government secrets
David Miranda
Glenn Greenwald's partner
CNNW 08/20/2013
Cooper: Did British authorities say that they detained you under, it’s called schedule seven of the UK Terrorism Act, that allows them to question someone to determine if they are or have been and i quote “concerned of the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism. Did they actually ask you anything about terrorism? Miranda: no, they didn't ask me anything about terrorism, not one question about it, and i think it's really weird because i was in there for, like, eight hours
David Miranda
Glenn Greenwald's partner
CNNW 08/20/2013
Miranda continued: without talking to anybody outside, and like they are just like keeping me -- i have to ask them, do i have to answer this? They ask -- just telling me like if you don't answer this, you are going to go to jail. You know, that's a big thing because like when they say like i was in this -- under this law, terrorist, you know what UK and united states do, they have all the powers in the world to do
David Miranda
Glenn Greenwald's partner
CNNW 08/20/2013
Miranda continued 2: anything they want with this because they follow Glenn and his career for the past eight years and I've seen many stories people like pick up in different countries, getting to this and just staying in prison and they vanish. Nobody seen them. So in that moment i was like really afraid what would happened to me. Cooper: sure. Maranda: you understand i was for eight hours without talking to anybody outside of the world. I didn't know what is happening, and they keep threatening me (about going to jail with that law.)
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
CNNW 08/20/2013
Cooper: glen, you got a call from some British official, he wouldn't give you his name just an identification number. What did that person say was happening with David? Greenwald: the very first thing he said to me is he was detained under the terrorism act of 2000 which is an obviously terrifying thing to hear about the person you love most in the world and
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
CNNW 08/20/2013
Greenwald continued: sharing your life with. And I then asked how long he had been detained. He said he had been detained by that point, already three hours, which made me know it was more than a routine secondary screening in immigration. I asked whether I could i speak with him or have a lawyer from the guardian sent in and they said you cannot speak with him and he does not have the right to a lawyer present with him. I asked them what their intentions were as far as how long he would be held and they said they had no idea and that is all they would tell me.
David Miranda
Glenn Greenwald's partner
CNNW 08/20/2013
Cooper: So David had visited this film maker you're reporting partner on the NSA stories, Laura Poitas, in Berlin. Miranda: yes. Cooper i read the guardian paid for David's flights. Glen, was he carrying classified material with him? Greenwald: well, I'm not going to talk about what he was carrying because that's our work product as journalist, remember both Laura and i are working with "the guardian" as journalists. What I would say is every single newsroom in the United
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
CNNW 08/20/2013
Greenwald continued: States, every single major news organization in the world has classified information reporting on what governments do in the secret, is what journalism is about. So if you want to support the idea that states can just go and confiscate from journalist, classified information, you should be demanding that your government go physically into newsrooms and seize whatever classified information is there. All of the best reporting over the last 40 years involved journalists having classified information, the pentagon papers, the bush torture sites, CIA black sites, the illegal warrantless ease dropping program that’s what investigative journalism is and if you want to
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
CNNW 08/20/2013
Greenwald continued: criminalize that, it means that you’re asking as a citizen to be kept ignorant and to allow people in power to conceal what they’re doing behind a wall of secrecy and to have no accountability or transparency. Journalism is not a crime and it is not terrorism.
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
CNNW 08/20/2013
Greenwald: Everything single thing that both David and I carry, even personal items, things for his school, are protected by very advanced encryption which they can't access. So taking it doesn't enable them to know what is in there, either. It’s not going to stop our reporting and doesn't do them any good. All it did, as i said this week, is give them a huge black eye in the world and make them look thuggish and authoritarian interfering in the journalism process, creating international incidents with the government of Brazil which is indignant with what is being done for no benefit at all to themselves,
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
CNNW 08/20/2013
Greenwald continued: which is why I said they will truly come to regret what they have done. Because aside from being oppressive and dangerous, it's also quite incompetent and really quite dumb.
Margaret Warner
Senior Correspondent, PBS News Hour
KQED 08/21/2013
Warner: the nation's top intelligence official today declassified documents showing that for three years, the national security agency, or NSA, collected more than 50,000 emails a year between Americans with no connection to foreign intelligence terrorism. The foreign intelligence surveillance court in 2011 ruled the collection methods unconstitutional. Today's documents show changes the NSA made so the program-- designed to target foreign intelligence-- could continue.
Siobhan Gorman
Wall Street Journal Reporter
KQED 08/21/2013
Gorman: the tone was a pretty sharpt rebuke. it talked about the –it criticized the government for not taking stronger measures to protect privacy. It criticized the government for not even really trying to find new ways to collect information so it would have these kind of violations. And in one of it’s sharpest rebukes, it said this is the third time in the last
Siobhan Gorman
Wall Street Journal Reporter
KQED 08/21/2013
Gorman continued: three years that we feel that the government has misrepresented its collection programs to the courts. So we've heard about the checks the court places on surveillance and this opinion shows on the one hand that the court does provide a major check but on the other it's after the fact and the NSA has a fair amount of leeway also to construct its surveillance programs and there's a certain amount of self-policing that goes on there
Siobhan Gorman
Wall Street Journal Reporter
KQED 08/21/2013
Gorman: domestic communications are being picked up by the NSA is just the same as it has been at least since 2008. The way that NSA handles those communications now is somewhat different. They are trying to basically segregate and quarantine the sets of communications that are likely to contain wholly domestic communications and handle them so that they don't get distributed throughout NSA databases or into intelligence reports and make their way kind of throughout the system in a searchable form.
Siobhan Gorman
Wall Street Journal Reporter
KQED 08/21/2013
Gorman: the nation security agency has entered into, under a court order, with major US telecommunications providers. Collectively, those providers cover 75% of united states communications. The NSA and the telephone companies have constructed sort of a two-step filtering system that means that the telecommunications companies do the first cut of filtering based on the guidelines that NSA provide under the court order and then
Siobhan Gorman
Wall Street Journal Reporter
KQED 08/21/2013
Gorman continued: they pass a subset of that information to NSA, they call it a data stream. NSA then takes that data stream and filters it again against specific criteria that it has, such as an e-mail address or a set of internet protocol addresses
Siobhan Gorman
Wall Street Journal Reporter
KQED 08/21/2013
Gorman: protecting American communications. And that is, that certain types of communications, just because of the way technology has evolved, are bundled together. And so you may end up with a bundle of communications where some small portion of it contains information that is responsive to what NSA is looking for with its foreign intelligence filters, but they have to hand over the whole bundle of communications, which may also include wholly domestic communications. The problem is you can’t decouple some of these sets of communications.
Harry Smith
News Correspondent, Al Jazeera America
ALJAZAM 08/22/2013
Smith: The court's decision can best be described as a partial victory for both sides. David Miranda's lawyers came here hoping to persuade the court that their client had been detained illegally when the police stopped him at Heathrow. They said that they used legislation designed to stop terrorist suspects, not to stop journalists. They said that equipment that had been seized from their client should be returned to their client and the police should be barred from examining the material on that equipment. The equipment included a laptop and some memory sticks. They said it was journalistic material
Harry Smith
News Correspondent, Al Jazeera America
ALJAZAM 08/22/2013
Smith continued: It was confidential and the confidentiality of it should be preserved. However, lawyers for the govt. argued that there were grounds here of national security. They said that as a result of the material they’d already examined they had started a criminal investigation. The judges said the police could hang onto the equipment. They could examine the material but only on grounds of national security.
Gwendolen Morgan
David Miaranda's Attorney
ALJAZAM 08/22/2013
Smith: The British government issued a statement welcoming the court’s decision. The other side gave their reaction on the steps of the court: Morgan: The undertaking the police sought were stopped in their tracks, and some of the basis on which the police sought to justify their position was roundly rejected. They also conceded that at midnight on Saturday, our client will be returned his property. We therefore consider this to be a partial victory, and we hope to have the courts full reasoning tomorrow afternoon.
Harry Smith
News Correspondent, Al Jazeera America
ALJAZAM 08/22/2013
Smith: So the police now have seven days to continue examining the documents that are contained on the seized equipment. The lawyers in court said there were tens of thousands of documents, and they will have seven days to go through that. After that we'll have to come back to the court, persuade the judges they have good ground for suspicion or return the equipment to Mr. Miranda. Judges will then also set a date for a hearing to decide whether or not David Miranda was legally detained when police stopped him at Heathrow airport.
Brian Shactman
Host, MSNBC Way Too Early
MSNBCW 08/22/2013
The NSA also collected as much as 56,000 e-mailed communications while it was trying to track foreign terrorists. The court criticized the agency for misrepresenting the scale of its spying practices. Judge John Bates wrote, quote, "This court is troubled that the government's revelations marks the third instance in less than three years in which the government has disclosed a substantial misrepresentation regarding the scope of a major collection program", end quote. NSA officials said the agency's activities were lawful and any mistakes were largely (unintentional).
Barack Obama
President
CNNW 08/23/2013
Cuomo: You have said it is not the business of the US government to spy on its own people. The more it seems to come out the more questions seem to be raised. Are you confident you know everything that's going on within that agency and you can say to the American people it's all done the right way? Obama: yes. But what I've also said is that it can only work if the American people trust what's going on and what's been clear since the disclosures that were made by Mr.. Snowden is that people don't
Barack Obama
President
CNNW 08/23/2013
Obama continued: have enough information and aren't confident enough that, between all the safeguards and checks that we put in place within the executive branch and the federal court oversight that takes place on the program, and Congressional oversight, people are still concerned as to whether their e-mails are being read or their phone calls being listened to. Cuomo: especially hearing they are then mistakes are made, (shakes your confidence)
Barack Obama
President
CNNW 08/23/2013
Obama: what was learned was that NSA had inadvertently accidentally pulled the e-mails of some Americans, in violation of their own rules, because of technical problems that they didn't realize. They presented those problems to the court. The court said this isn't going to cut it. You're going to have to improve the safeguards given these technical problems. That's exactly what happened. All these safeguards, checks, audits, oversight, worked. Now, i think there are legitimate concerns that people
Barack Obama
President
CNNW 08/23/2013
Obama continued: have that the technology is moving so quick that at some point, does the technology outpace the laws that are in place and the protections that are in place and do some of the systems end up being like a loaded gun out there that somebody at some future point could abuse? Because there are no allegations, and i am very confident knowing the NSA and how they operate, that purposely somebody's out there trying
Barack Obama
President
CNNW 08/23/2013
Obama continued 2: to abuse this program or listen in on people's e-mail or -- Cuomo: you're confident in that? Obama: i am confident in that, but what i recognize is that we're going to have to continue to improve the safeguards and as technology moves forward, that means that we may be able to build technologies to give people more assurance and we do have to do a better job of giving people confidence in how these programs work. So what I've said is I am open to working with Congress to figure out can we get more
Barack Obama
President
CNNW 08/23/2013
Obama continued 3: transparently in terms of how the oversight court works, do we need a public advocate who people have confidence in, but we've also got to do it in a way that recognizes we have hostile folks out there that will potentially try to do us harm.
Erin Ade
Journalist at RT
KCSM 08/23/2013
In a strange turn of events, British newspaper. "the independent" came out with an exclusive story about a secret service base run by the united kingdom in the middle east. The article says “The Independent is not revealing the precise location of the station but information on its activities was contained in leaked documents obtained from NSA by Edward Snowden. Why is this so odd? Well, That’s because Snowden had this response to the Independent’s article:
Erin Ade
Journalist at RT
KCSM 08/23/2013
Snowden statement: "I have never spoken with, worked with, or provided any journalistic material to the independent. It appears that the UK government is seeking to create an appearance that the Guardian and Washington Post's disclosures are harmful and they are doing so by intentionally leaking harmful information attitude it to others -- and attributing it to others." "the independent" denies this.
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Griego: Nate Cardozo from the electronic frontier foundation join us. Matier: Is the NSA reading our messages right now? Cardozo: yes, absolutely. It’s not like there’s a person sitting there reading it but hey are scanning every email as you type it. Matier: as you type it they are scanning it? Cardozo: as soon as you send it, it goes through a splitter. There's a fiber optic splitter down at the Folsom street facility here in san Francisco. One copy goes to whoever you're sending it to the other copy goes to the NSA. Matier: you're kidding. Every email sent all around?
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Cardozo: since about 2002, yes. Matier: how do they have possibly the capacity to store all that stuff and even if they get it how do they figure out what to look at? Cardozo: they have the most powerful computers in the world. They are building the biggest data center in the world in Utah. This thing is going to store something on the nature of 12 exobites. If you’ve ever even heard of that, that quantity of storage. Absolutely incredible amount of computers. Matier: Now your group was one of the groups that was involved in this legal action that led to the release this week of the judges order concerning NSA. What did he (say in effect?)
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Cardozo: the judge said that the NSA has been lying to the only court, and this is a court that meets in secret, the NSA has been lying to that court for years and years and the court said it needed to stop. This opinion was from 2011 and we just got it two days ago. Matier: so this brings up a question to me. I don't know what you guys think, do we have any privacy at all when you go on the internet?
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Cardozo: from our perspective at the Electronic Frontier Foundation yes, absolutely, the Fourth Amendment says you have a right to be secure in your papers and effects. That includes your emails. Matier: but your email isn't the U.S. mail. It's owned by Google or it's owned by Facebook. It's owned by Yahoo. Do those people have -- is it up to them who they decide to turn it over to the government or a company or somebody that that's looking at it wants to look at it? Cardozo: it's not. Federal law says that they have to keep that email private unless the government comes with a warrant. The NSA has not gotten warrants to read your email and yet they are getting copies anyway. Matier: isn't that amazing? Anchors: yeah.
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Mallicoat: Is there some sort of computer that just looks for keywords and if they find something there they don't like it spits it out and then they read the email? They can't read them all. Cardozo: so it's our understanding that yes, there is a computer looking for the keywords. However, if it finds the keywords and an actual person reads it, if it doesn't, they are storing it any way for up to five years, and the NSA has this interesting term they use the word “collect”. They don't “collect” an email
Nate Cardozo
Staff Attorney Electronic Frontier Foundation
KPIX 08/23/2013
Cardozo continued: until they read it. Even if they are storing it, that's not “collection”. Matier: so, in other words, they say, whatever the case, watch what you put on the keyboard, frank. [ laughter ] you are going right down to Folsom street one copy goes to summit and the other one to uncle sam. Boy, uncle spam. Thanks
Tucker Carlson
Co-host FOX & Friends Weekends
FOXNEWSW 08/25/2013
The agency violated privacy rules over 3,000 times in one year and now another abuse of power. Officials claim NSA officers used the agency's authority to spy on love interests. Spouses, boyfriends, girlfriends, several times. I am joined by Congressman Trey Gowdy. Congressman thanks for joining us this morning
Trey Gowdy
U.S. Representative R-SC, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform
FOXNEWSW 08/25/2013
Well, the cloak of trustworthiness was stripped away long ago tucker. Let’s look at the chronology. we were first told the programs don't exist. That proved to be false. Then we were told it was only foreign, not domestic. That proved to be false. We were told there was sufficient oversight. That proved to be false. We were told it was all metadata and not content. That proved to be false.
Trey Gowdy
U.S. Representative R-SC, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform
FOXNEWSW 08/25/2013
One of my colleagues specifically asked in a briefing, not classified, but in a briefing, could this be used so that you could hypothetically spy on a lover and he received a very condescending no. Well it turned out my colleague was right and the folks in the so called intelligence committee have been 0 for 6.
Bob Corker
Senator, R-TN, ranking member of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
FOXNEWSW 08/25/2013
Wallace: Senate Foreign Relations, as you sit here today, do you feel that you actually know what the government is and isn't doing in surveilling Americans? Corker: No.. I mean, i think -- i don't think there is many people -- there are many people that work harder than i do. I'm not on the Intelligence Committee and obviously, they are privy to information that I am not. But, absolutely not. And that's why I wrote a letter this week to the President, asked that the head of this organization
Bob Corker
Senator, R-TN, ranking member of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
FOXNEWSW 08/25/2013
Corker continued: come in and brief folks from top to bottom to explain every program that's underway, understand so we can understand its intent and to understand how appropriate oversight is taking place.
Bob Corker
Senator, R-TN, ranking member of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
FOXNEWSW 08/25/2013
You just mentioned that are leaked out, the American people want to know that those of us who are elected, Elliott and I, understand fully what's happening here. I don't think we do. I would imagine there are even members of the intelligence committee themselves that don't fully understand the gamut of things that are taking place. It's our responsibility to know those things. To ensure they’re in balance. I hope as soon as we get back, there will be a full briefing from top to bottom so that can happen.
Eliot Engel
U.S. Representative D-NY Ranking Member on the House Foreign Affairs Committee
FOXNEWSW 08/25/2013
I am very troubled by the things that are coming out day after day. Showing that we have not really been told the truth. Do i think that Congress needs to revisit this whole issue and come up with a plan. What I have seen so far is really unsatisfactory. We were told one thing, Congress was told one thing and as Senator corker said, we don't feel that we are being told everything. And that's not really the way things should work. So I'm troubled by it i think we need to look at it and i think we (need to revamp the program.)
John Bolton
former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations
FOXNEWSW 08/25/2013
Espionage against the United Nations took place in 2012, which I find deliciously ironic that the Obama administration is spying on the United Nations. Here is what I think. Any gathering of foreigners is a legitimate target for American espionage, unless we have agreement that precludes us from doing it. And any foreign government absent such an agreement that doesn't think we may be spying on them doesn't live in the real world. That's the way it is.
Kwame Holman
PBS Correspondent
KQED 08/26/2013
Holman: The united nations said today it expects all member states to respect the privacy of diplomatic communications. That came after the German magazine "der Spiegel" reported the US national security agency hacked into internal communications at UN. headquarters in new York. The magazine cited documents obtained from NSA leaker Edward Snowden. They claimed the NSA also bugged the European union's offices in Washington.
Michael Hayden
Former Director of the NSA and Director of the CIA
CNNW 08/29/2013
Blitzer: (information from Edward Snowden, detailing the $52.6 billion, what’s called, black budget, of the U.S. Intelligence community.) This was always kept secret, how this money was spent. It's now been out there. What, if any damage, do you believe was caused by this report? Hayden: We'll have to see. I read the story that was posted, all right? And that talks in general figures, what the CIA budget was, what the NSA budget was, and so on. That causes some harm, but not a great deal of harm. But I’ve been told, you go to the website and start clicking on things and get down to specific operational activities. That could be very, very disruptive.
Lori Rothman
Anchor FOX Business Network
FBC 08/29/2013
Rothman: Washington Post also out here with a controversial new report detailing how much money the U.S. allocates to it’s 16 intelligence agencies, and what each agent does with the funds. The top secret so called black budget was given to the Post by NSA leaker Edward Snowden, It shows a $52.6 billion budget being allocated to the intelligence community for this fiscal year. Among the top spenders, the CIA, with $14.7 billion dollars
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
FBC 08/29/2013
Rothman continued: the NSA with $10.8 billion and the National Reconnaissance Office with $10.3 billion. Some lawmakers furious about the report, House Intelligence Committee Chair, Mike Rogers, saying quote “Disclosures like the one published today have nothing to do with protecting American’s liberty or advancing other public interests. Disclosures of our capabilities and programs jeopardize the efforts of the American men and women in the Intelligence Community who have dedicated themselves to protecting American lives and interests.”
Kwame Holman
PBS Correspondent
KQED 08/29/2013
Holman: Another major disclosure has emerged from documents leaked by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden. The so-called "black budget" details $52 billion in spending this year, for secret U.S. intelligence efforts. "The Washington Post" reports that, among other things, the national security agency was investigating up to 4,000 reports of possible security breaches by its own employees, last year.
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